Health CareHealth ClinicHealth-Care-Clinic.Org
Diseases & Conditions InjuriesMedical Lab TestsDrugsHerbal Home RemediesHerbal MedicinesVitaminsFruitsVegetables
Vegetables
Artichoke
Asparagus
Beet
Broccoli
Brussels Sprouts
Cabbage
Carrot
Cauliflower
Celery Root
Celery
Chicory
Collard
Corn, Sweet
Dandelion
Eggplant
Endive And Escarole
Garlic
Kale
Kohlrabi
Leek
Lentil
Lettuce
Lima Bean
Mushroom
Mustard Greens
Okra
Onion
Parsley
Parsnip
Pea
Potato
Radish
Rutabaga
Salsify
Snap bean
Soybean
Spinach
Sweet Potato
Swiss Chard
Turnip and Turnip Greens
Watercress


Turnip And Turnip Greens

The turnip, which belongs to the mustard family, is reported to have come from Russia, Siberia, and the Scandinavian peninsula. It has been used since ancient times. Columella wrote in A.D. 42 that two varieties of turnips were grown in what is now known as France. Pliny refers to five varieties, and stated that the broadbottom flat turnip and the globular turnip were the most popular.

Back in the sixteenth century, giant turnips created comment. In 1558, Matthiolus spoke of having heard of long purple turnips weighing thirty pounds; however, this may be considered small compared with the turnip weighing one hundred pounds grown in California in 1850.

Cartier sowed turnip seed in Canada as early as 1540, and they were cultivated in Virginia in 1609, and in Massachusetts as early as 1629. In 1707 they were plentiful around Philadelphia, and their use was recorded in South Carolina as early as 1779.

Turnips may be served steamed, with drawn butter or cream sauce. They are also excellent raw and shredded in salads.

Turnip greens are excellent cooked the same way spinach is usually cooked. The greens should be cooked in a covered pan until tender, using only the water that clings to the leaves.

Regardless of variety, turnips have much the same flavor if grown under the same conditions. They may be distinguished by shape, as round, flat, or top-shaped, and also by color of the flesh­white or yellow-by the color of the skin, and by the leaves. Varieties like Seven Top and Shogoin are grown almost exclusively for the leaves.

The most popular variety is the Purple Top White Globe. This variety has a large globe-shaped root, with an irregularly marked purple cap, and its flesh is white, sweet, crisp, and tender. The leaves are dark green, large, and erect.

Benefits of Turnip And Turnip Greens

Turnips are very high in sulfur and are sometimes gas forming. The root vegetable can be considered a carbohydrate vegetable. If eaten raw, they have a high content of vitamin C. Turnip juice is especially good for any mucous and catarrhal conditions. They have been used successfully in all bronchial disturbances, even asthma. Turnip packs over the chest are good for relieving bronchial disorders and packs over the throat are good for sore throats. When fresh and young, turnips can be used raw in salads. They leave an alkaline ash, and have a low calorie content and low carbohydrate content. They can be used in most diets.

Turnip leaves are considered good for controlling calcium in the body, as are all other greens. They have been used successfully in the South to combat pellagra, which is a disease caused by lack of calcium in the body.

Nutrients in one pound (root vegetable)

Calories
117
Iron
2 mg
Protein
3.9 g
trace
Fat
0.8 g
0.16 mg
Carbohydrates
25.7 g
.26 mg
Calcium
152 mg
2.2 mg
Phosphorus
117 mg
Ascorbic acid
140 mg

Nutrients in one pound (turnip greens only)

Calories
140
Iron
9.1 mg
Protein
11 g
34,470 I.U.
Fat
1.5 g
0.37 mg
Carbohydrates
20.6 g
2.15 mg
Calcium
987 mg
2.9 mg
Phosphorus
190 mg
Ascorbic acid
519 mg
First AidHealth BlogContact UsRss Feed
Bookmark and Share

(c) Health-care-clinic.org All rights reserved

Disclaimer: Health-care-clinic.org website is designed for educational purposes only. It is not intended to treat, diagnose, cure, or prevent any disease. Always take the advice of professional health care for specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment. We will not be liable for any complications, or other medical accidents arising from the use of any information on this web site. Please note that medical information is constantly changing. Therefore some information may be out of date.